Global events


One more week before Mercury stations direct. Hang in there! Though maybe not quite like London mayor, Boris Johnson, here.

Lots of Olympics replays in more ways than one, ranging from lost keys to retroactive disqualification to a Twitter fracas.

Outside of the Games, Lynn Hayes sums up other events here.

Image: Harold Lloyd in Safety Last! (1923)

Among the other issues that have plagued the London Olympics organisers in the past weeks, this whimsical incident takes place: during the women’s football (soccer) match in Glasgow between North Korea and Colombia, some official mistakenly displays the South Korean flag on the big screen instead. Perhaps not so whimsical to the people on the wrong end of it, I acknowledge, and especially since the two Koreas are still officially at war.

And then US Presidential election candidate, Mitt Romney, walks right into it on his visit to London with several high profile gaffes, which London mayor Boris Johnson manages to capitalise on in front of a crowd of 60,000.

It would be funny (and nice) if London were actually galvanised to pull off the event flawlessly, though with this clanger, and a few more hours to go, I’m still holding my breath!

Another Mercury retrograde is upon us, and this post is late as usual. My excuse is – I’ve been writing, but more on that in another post.

With all that has been going on in the world in the past weeks (what with the ongoing phone hacking scandal, European economic crises, US political standoff and Middle East unrest among other things), the usual delays experienced during Mercury retrograde can seem pretty inconsequential. But the slowdown may offer a good opportunity to regroup and catch our breath, and take a second look at the situation instead of reacting.

Mercury this period retrogrades from 2 to 26 August 2011, from 1+° Virgo to 18+° Leo. How is Mercury expressed in Leo?

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At the moment, there are a lot of planets in Aries, including Mercury. Aries is the sign of pioneering ambition and passionate adventure; Mercury in Aries may be expressed as:

  • Communicates assertively, forcefully, directly, confidently
  • Restless urge for action underlies energetic way of speaking and creative use of skills
  • Confrontation and forceful release of energy are necessary in order to learn; capacity to intuitively grasp essentials
  • Reasoning ability is colored by a self-willed release of energy toward new experience; daring new thoughts are therefore often preferred
  • Establishing true give-and-take with others can be hindered by insensitive and inconsiderate self-assertion (Arroyo 62)

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Mercury retrogrades from 5 to 30 December 2010, from 5° 55′ Capricorn to 19° 39′ Sagittarius, but the current shadow phase is already throwing up plenty as the Wikileaks saga shows no sign of losing momentum.

Mercury is in Capricorn now and Capricorn is the sign of government and large organisations. Is it any surprise that instead of addressing their own accountability, they seem to be out to shoot the messenger (which is Mercury’s key role), Wikileaks’ founder, Julian Assange, through unrelated allegations.

A couple of astrologers share their thoughts on the matter:

Update, 7 December 2010: Here’s an interview with Assange on TED in July 2010.

Image: Leaking tap. Source: stock.xchng

I’ve had a crazy-intense time these past week, especially around the last Full Moon in Scorpio. Still trying to process it all.

What to say about this retrograde? What can be said?

Greece.

Wall Street.

March on Wall Street.

Dow Jones tech glitch.

Oil rig spill.

Second Icelandic volcanic ash cloud.

UK Election chaos.

Image: Horse riding. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

The travel chaos caused by the Icelandic volcano from last week is very much an effect of Mercury retrograde writ large (Lynn Hayes mentions this), as the cardinal t-square intensifies. This is not to say that Mercury retrograde ’caused’ the eruption or the delays, merely that the planetary positions appear to reflect events and experiences on earth.

It is hard to not to be awed by the spectacle of this unprecedented event in modern times. The last time this volcano erupted was in 1822, modern aviation hadn’t yet been invented to be disrupted. Although the disruption is extensive — not just impacting holiday travel, but also business and trade — the lack of hysterical demands for accountability is conspicuous. It’s a worrying situation obviously, but how can one find fault with a volcano that is doing what it does? As this op-ed article from The Observer notes:

… we cannot blame the volcano, only observe how liberating it is sometimes to be powerless before nature.

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